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Adult sex dating in milford nebraska

Unpack – Misused word for analyze, consider, assess.

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Let’s either say ‘press conference’ or ‘press release’ or come up with something more original, intelligent and interesting! “This industry buzzword has slipped into usage in news reporting and now that they have started, they can’t seem to stop using it.” – Richard W. “Men don’t need another disgusting-sounding word thrown into the vocabulary to describe something they do…You’re just taking too much room on this train seat, be a little more polite…” – Carrie Hansen, Caledonia, Mich. Stop calling your boyfriend ‘bae’.” — Evie Dunagan, Manheim, Penn. I heard someone refer to their ramen noodles as ‘bae’! “The most annoying term of affection to show up in years. “A dumb, annoying word.” — James Becker, Holly, Mich. Priddy noted that it quickly jumped from the weather forecast to other areas, as he said he knew it would: “Today’s St. “I just received an e-mail for a book called ‘Marriage Hacks.’ I have seen articles about life hacks, home improvement hacks, car hacks, furniture hacks, painting hacks, work hacks and pretty much any other hack you can think of. Phrases such as ‘I have the skill set to do that properly’ or anything resembling that phrase, shows the speaker is seriously lacking skills in the art of conversation. By the way, your website is so ‘swag.'” – Alex, Roanoke, Va. Do we call people who like wine ‘winies’ or beer lovers ‘beeries’? “‘Someone who enjoys food’ applies to everyone on Earth. ‘Oh, I’m an airie; I just love to breathe.’ ‘Could we do it at 11, instead?We thought it might rival “fiscal cliff,” the most-nominated phrase on the 2013 list, but it didn’t come close.Cal of Cherry Hill, NJ wonders, “Are there intellectual creditors?For instance, “How did you learn to play the piano? Perhaps the users feel that it is a word that is least likely to offend people, but I consider it to be imprecise language that, over time, dumbs down the art of effective discourse.” – Richard Fry, Marathon, Ont. Contrast things that are self-evidently taken to be problematic with, say, actual problems like a hole in the ozone layer or a job loss.” – Adam Rosen, Asheville, N. “Often used with ‘engagement.’ If someone is disengaged, they’re not really a stakeholder in the first place.” Answer: “So my dad was in a classical music club…” – Bob Forrest, Tempe Ariz. The word serves no purpose in the sentence and to me is like fingernails on a chalkboard. LSSU, please engage your stakeholders by adding this pretentious jargon to your list. Harley Carter of Calgary, Alberta, says he has heard it with another word popular in business-speak, “socialize,” which means to spread an idea around to see what others think of it.A self-snapped picture need not have a name all its own beyond ‘photograph.’ It may only be a matter of time before photos of one’s self and a friend will become ‘dualies.’ LSSU has an almost self-imposed duty to carry out this banishment now.” – Lawrence, Coventry, Conn. “The fastest over-used word of the 21st century.” – Sean, New London, NH. So, hashtag-knockitoff.” – Kuahmel, Gardena, Calif. “Used when talking about Twitter, but everyone seems to add it to everyday vocabulary. When running out of cashews becomes nut-ageddon, it’s time to re-evaluate your metaphors.” – Rob, Sellersville, Penn.

“The newest dictionary entry should leave just as quickly.” – Bruce, Edmonton, Alb. Now it is seeping from the Twittersphere into everyday expression. #annoying #stopthat #hashtag #hashtag #hashtag .” – Alex, Rochester, Mich. The 30-year anniversary of this hilarious 1983 Michael Keaton movie seems to have released some pent-up emotions. “It was a funny movie in its time, but the phrase should refer only to the film, not to men in the real world. ” says Pat, of Chicago, who suggests we peruse the website, the manly blog of stay-at-home parenting. Politicians never fail to disappoint in providing fodder for the list.

1171, which says, “Although the ‘price point’ of effective new drugs…may initially be out of reach for many patients…” “It has no ‘point.’ It is just a ‘price.’” – Guy Michael, Cherry Hill, N. “Usually used in a sentence explaining the ‘secret’ in excruciating public detail. “Whether it’s a ‘free gift’ (banished in 1988) or droopy clothing, this word is neither useful nor fancy.” – Jeff Drake, Saint Albans, West Va.

Is this a metaphor for business success based on the fast food industry? “It has become too frequent in business discussions. “An annoying bit of hyperbole about the latest saucy picture or controversy that is already becoming trite.” – Tim Bednall, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia “Meaning a post or video or whatever will have so much Internet traffic that it will ‘break the internet.’ It’s being used for every headline and video. “I hope the list doesn’t ‘break the internet.’ (How else would I read it next year)? “It seems as if every politician who makes a statement has to ‘walk it back,’ meaning retract the statement, or explain it in laborious detail to the extent that the statement no longer has any validity or meaning once it has been ‘walked back.’” – Max Hill, Killeen, Tex. Kenneth Ross of Glastonbury, Conn., and Bob Priddy of Jefferson City, Mo., were among many who saw this storming in last January. “The word has become so overused that it is not ‘swag’ to not use the word ‘swag.'” – Devin, Farwell, Mich.

Nearly all who nominated it found a way to use it in their entries, so we wonder if they’re really willing to let go. “It’s #obnoxious #ridiculous #annoying and I wish it would disappear.” – Jen, Sault Ste. It received nearly as many nominations as “selfie” and “twerk” from coast to coast in the U. It is an insult to the millions of dads who are the primary caregivers for their children. Used by members of each political party when describing members of the other.

#goodluckwiththat “A technical term for a useful means of categorizing content in social media, the word is abused as an interjection in verbal conversation and advertising. A wandering prefix (see 2010’s “Obama-“) finally settles down.

Post-Truth – To paraphrase the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, we are entitled to our own opinions but not to our own facts. What’s considered as such is best left to historians rather than the contemporary media. Golf greens are the closest grass comes to being manicured. Needs to return to its genesis: perfectly groomed eyebrows. Ghost – To abruptly end communication, especially on social media.